Capitol

Vote List

To see how your congressional representatives have voted on national parks legislation, use the search below. The search results will include both House and Senate members even though NPCA only scored votes taken in the House during the 112th Congress. There were insufficient national park-related votes in the Senate to compile a scorecard.

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Records 1 - 7 of 7

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Name Sort the Name column in ascending order. Reloads page. Sort the Name column in descending order. Reloads page. Date Sort the Date column in ascending order. Reloads page. Sort the Date column in descending order. Reloads page. Description   Our Position   Result Sort the Result column in ascending order. Reloads page. Sort the Result column in descending order. Reloads page.
09/20/2012
On September 20, 2012, the House voted on a motion to suspend the rules and pass H.R. 5987, sponsored by Rep. Hastings (R-WA). The bill failed the two-thirds threshold needed for passage by a vote of 237 yeas-180 nays. The Manhattan Project National Historical Park Act would establish a park with sights in Washington State, New Mexico and Tennessee that would preserve locations related to the history of the development of the atomic bomb. Along with deepening public understanding of the role our nation played in this enormous endeavor of ushering in the atomic age, a Manhattan Project National Historical Park would serve the equally important role of educating future generations about the awesome power, consequences and moral responsibility wrought through this legacy. Our National Park System is designed to commemorate the full range of American history: good, bad and indifferent. A YES VOTE IS THE CORRECT VOTE.
Support
Failed
06/19/2012
On June 19, 2012, the House voted on a package of bills that could have negatively impacted national park units along the borders with Mexico and Canada, as well as Cape Hatteras National Seashore and North Cascades National Park. The bill passed by a vote of 232 yeas-188 nays. The most extreme provision of the bill would have created a zone within 100 miles of our country's international land border with Mexico and Canada where the most basic protections under law for national parks, historic sites, and other protected areas could cease to exist at the whim of the Department of Homeland Security. The provision affecting Cape Hatteras would have undermined the National Park Service's carefully drafted plan to protect families visiting the beaches and nesting shorebirds and turtles, while still allowing vehicles to access many of the beaches. And the provision impacting North Cascades would have allowed the construction of a costly, little-used road through designated wilderness. A NO VOTE IS THE CORRECT VOTE.
Oppose
Passed
04/17/2012
On April 17, 2012, the House voted on an amendment to the Sportsmen's Heritage Act sponsored by Rep. Foxx (R-NC), that would have required Presidential monument designations under the Antiquites Act to be approved by governors and state legislatures where the proposed monument is located. The amendment passed by a vote of 223 yeas-198 nays. As mentioned in the first vote description above, the Antiquities Act has been exceptionally important to the development of the National Park System, protecting such places as Muir Woods, the Statue of Liberty, Acadia, Zion, Olympic and Grand Canyon national parks and many other national treasures. Although provisions like those in H.Amdt.1012 might seem reasonable at first glance, they effectively create restrictions and obstacles to making designations, essentially defeating the purpose of the Act which is to enable the President to act swiftly to protect sensitive federal land from harm. The Antiquities Act already properly balances legislative and executive powers. A NO VOTE IS THE CORRECT VOTE.
Oppose
Agreed To
04/17/2012
On April 17, 2012, the House voted on a technical correction amendment to the Sportsmen's Heritage Act sponsored by Rep. Holt (D-NJ), that would have clarified which units of the National Park System should remain closed to hunting under the bill. The amendment failed 152 yeas-260 nays. As written, H.R. 4089 could have opened all units of the National Park System, including National Parks, National Battlefields, National Memorials, National Historic Sites, and more to hunting. Many of these sites are places where visitors go to learn and contemplate serious events in our nation's history, or places to enjoy hiking, camping and viewing wildlife in their natural habitat. Rep. Holt's amendment would have made clear that the bill's exclusion applied to all national park units where hunting is neither allowed nor appropriate. A YES VOTE IS THE CORRECT VOTE.
Support
Failed
03/01/2012
On March 1, 2012 the House passed S. 1134, sponsored by Sen. Klobuchar (D-MN) by a vote of 339-80 nays. The bill paved the way for construction of a massive, freeway-style bridge over the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway, a unit of the National Park System, at a place where there is no freeway. The bridge will cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars and harm the recreational and scenic values for which this river was granted protection under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (WSRA). By authorizing an exemption of the WSRA for this project, Congress effectively overturned 40 years of protections for the St. Croix River and set a precedent that could threaten the 166 other rivers that are protected under this Act. S. 1134 was signed into law by President Obama on March 14, 2012. A NO VOTE IS THE CORRECT VOTE.
Oppose
Passed
01/25/2012
On January 25, 2012 the House passed H.R. 1022, sponsored by Rep. Speier (D-CA) by a vote of 338 yeas-70 nays. The bill authorizes a study to determine how the Buffalo Soldiers' story should be represented within the National Park System. The African-American troops who came to be known as the Buffalo Soldiers played a central role in protecting Yosemite, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks; they were, in fact, our national parks' first "guardians". Colonel Charles Young, whose home in Ohio President Obama designated as a national monument, served as the first African-American superintendent of a national park at Sequoia while commanding a troop of Buffalo Soldiers. A YES VOTE IS THE CORRECT VOTE.
Support
Passed
02/19/2011
On February 19, 2011 the House voted on an amendment to the FY11 Continuing Resolution sponsored by then-Representative Heller (R-NV), to eliminate funding to implement the Antiquities Act, a law that provides the President authority to protect significant federal lands that contain noteworthy natural, cultural and scientific resources. The amendment failed by a vote of 209 yeas-213 nays. With the exception of the Organic Act of 1916, no law has had more influence over the development of the modern National Park System and our other public lands than the Antiquities Act. The Act was passed by a Republican-led Congress and signed by a Republican President, Theodore Roosevelt. Since then, sixteen U.S. Presidents have declared 135 national monuments under the Act; eight Republican Presidents, eight Democratic Presidents. Over the last decade, President George W. Bush used his authority under the Antiquities Act to designate the African Burial Ground in New York City and also created the largest Marine Protected Area in the world with his designation of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument in 2006, and President Obama has helped to measurably diversify the National Park System with his designations of Fort Monroe in Virginia and César Chávez in California, among others. Out of the 174 national monuments designated since 1906, the National Park Service manages 134 or 77% and they are some of the most iconic places in America. A NO VOTE IS THE CORRECT VOTE.
Oppose
Failed

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